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Plans, projects and how-to's for home machinists

Free Plans: Jeroen Jonkman’s “Stirling 60″

Jeroen Jonkman built this Gamma type Stirling engine for his father’s 60th birthday.  He also drew a nice set of plans for it and is very generously sharing them.  You can download them here from MachinistBlog (PDF) or from HMEM if you’re registered there and logged in.  I asked, but Jeroen didn’t tell me much about himself.  But I can tell from the videos he uploaded to his YouTube channel that he’s a skilled machinist and prolific builder of model steam and Stirling engines, many of which are of his own design.  Jeroen is also Dutch and I find it interesting that two other Dutchmen, Jan Ridders and Jos De Vink, have built some of the world’s most beautiful and interesting model Stirling engines.  Jeroen has not produced as many engines as those two but I wouldn’t be surprised if he does someday.

18 comments to Free Plans: Jeroen Jonkman’s “Stirling 60″

  • sergio
    December 24, 2012 at 2:16 PM | Reply

    Good afternoon,
    need help with engine Striling 60.
    Please tell me where can I can get?
    Thank you.

  • rleete
    December 25, 2012 at 7:49 PM | Reply

    What’s the problem? Maybe we can help. Otherwise, you’ll have to register at HMEM (see link above) and ask for assistance there.

  • sergio
    December 26, 2012 at 2:59 PM | Reply

    Good afternoon rleete
    Thank you very much for responding.
    I would like to provide me an E-mail to send some pictures and ask what are the critical points to consider to work properly.
    Both the main piston and the power piston are sealed, that is, without any leakage. Not if it is correct to give both fit and if needed give out the air by one of the pistons.
    Thank you very much for the help.
    I feel bad after so much work not work.

  • Rob
    December 26, 2012 at 3:14 PM | Reply

    Sergio – Follow the link below to the HMEM forum and ask your questions.

    http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/f12/plans-brass-stirling-60-a-8937/

  • rleete
    December 26, 2012 at 3:47 PM | Reply

    The main things to consider for a Stirling engine are fit of the piston (smooth sliding, with no tight spots) and eliminating friction as much as possible. The power piston must be airtight, but the displacer should have clearance all around. Friction is the real showstopper. If a joint is binding, even slightly, it can prevent the engine running as they have very little power.

    Also, my Stirling engine needs to warm up for several minutes before it will run. Put the heat source on it and let it sit for a minute or two before trying to get it to run. Finally, an alcohol flame will burn hotter, and may make it easier to run than using a candle.

  • Bob Harper
    February 2, 2013 at 6:34 AM | Reply

    Beautiful simplicity!

  • Terry Froggatt
    February 22, 2013 at 6:52 AM | Reply

    Good morning. I have downloaded the drawings of J. Jonkman’s Sterling ’60′ engine – superb clarity, nothing too difficult to machine. But I cannot find the connecting rods, displacer to crank, nor Tumbler to crank. Do I need to measure these empirically when the time comes to make them, or can I scale them off the drawing on Sheet 3/8 ?
    Many thanks.

  • aziz ozdemir
    May 10, 2013 at 8:18 AM | Reply

    Hello, good afternoon,

    I’m wondering about cylinder’s minimum temprature for the mechanism’s start to circle. I’m waiting for reply. Thanks.

    Sincerely, Aziz the engineer.

  • rleete
    May 13, 2013 at 7:34 AM | Reply

    Not sure of temperature, but it has to be warmed up. Mine won’t start until the flame has been on for about 30 seconds.

    Even then, it has to be manually started by spinning the flywheel. A quick flick with a finger usually gets it going. As it gets hotter, it runs faster.

    Hope this helps.

  • Boomer999
    August 20, 2013 at 7:46 PM | Reply

    Hello I am building the Jonkman Stirling 60 as my first motor. Everything is clear to me from the drawings but one thing. How does the displacer rod connect to the displacer. My drawing shows the displacer with no holes in the base of it. And the displacer rod is just that, a rod. No threads. The drawings point to that area and says to solder. Should there not be a hole here for the rod to go into the base of the displacer. What am I missing here? I am sure it’s obvious to someone. But it’s not coming to me.
    Your input would be appreciated
    Shannon

  • rleete
    August 21, 2013 at 2:15 PM | Reply

    The rod is soldered into the end of the displacer. Yes, there should be a hole in the displacer base.

  • Boomer999
    August 21, 2013 at 7:49 PM | Reply

    Thank you. I thought so, but was unsure. Is there any reason it could not be threaded.
    As well I am having a hard time sourcing some perlitic cast iron for the bearing. Could I not just use brass? If not is there another substitute?
    Thanx again
    Shannon

  • rleete
    August 22, 2013 at 7:35 AM | Reply

    Yes, it can be threaded. I, personally, would thread it instead of soldering so that the length can be tweaked if necessary. I’d also add a jam nut to prevent loosening.

    Brass or bronze are perfectly acceptable alternatives for the bearing. You could also use graphite, but that may be harder to find than the cast iron. About the only thing not to use is steel, as the shaft is steel and galling may result. If you use brass for the shaft, you could use steel for the bearing.

  • Boomer999
    August 22, 2013 at 7:16 PM | Reply

    Thank you sir.

  • Boomer999
    August 29, 2013 at 3:48 PM | Reply

    another question. Just want to double cheque as I am two hours from city any going there tomorrow. In the prints for the candle holder. It says the radius on the cuts for the around the edge is R5. Would that be a 10mm ball end mill then?

  • rleete
    September 4, 2013 at 7:17 AM | Reply

    Yes, that would be correct. 10mm is pretty close to 3/8″, so that would work.

    As those features are purely decorative, it is in no way critical. You could use any size that looks good to you. Heck, you could even knurl it and it would be okay.

  • Hans
    February 26, 2014 at 7:47 AM | Reply

    Same question as Terry Froggatt already asked one year ago (without getting an answer)…. where to find the dimensions of the connecting rods, displacer to crank and Tumbler to crank?
    Thanks, Hans

  • rleete
    February 27, 2014 at 12:41 PM | Reply

    Try joining HMEM and posting the question there. The original designer may be able to clarify, or other members who have built this engine.

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