Posts
Comments

MachinistBlog.com

Plans, projects and how-to's for home machinists

Avatar

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
rotary valve 2 culinder marine steam engine
December 12, 2009
6:39 PM
Avatar
Rob
Upstate New York
Admin
Members
Forum Posts: 146
Member Since:
January 4, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I'd drill the hole in the cylinder block by mounting it in a four-jaw, even though it might take some practice to get the block located where you want it.

Bogs also suggests an inexpensive alternative for finishing the cylinder bores if you don't have a reamer.  Read the post again, the excerpt describes how to do it.  I've used the technique to enlarge holes a few-thou.

You can make an adjustable lap (if that's the right term) by using a hardwood dowel that has been split at the end. with a drywall screw that has been partially screwed in.  You can adjust the diameter of the dowel by adjusting the screw in or out. 

December 10, 2009
8:21 AM
Avatar
ageofaquarius21
Nova Scotia, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 3
Member Since:
December 7, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

My thanks! I have yet to turn any metal so my first task will be to get the lathe bits ground

and installed, then to practice on some rough stock as I relearn the controls.  I do have

a milling attachment and a steady rest, both have been restored, but I have never used

either, even those many years ago.

As for flat metal I found some old planed bits nicely squared off last night which I think I can

use as the cylinder block, etc. At least that's the hope. If not, its off to the local machine

shop to scrounge for bits and pieces if the owner will sell them to me. Oh, I have the

planer the blocks were done on. It's a tabletop Hendey likely 100 + years old and I have

torn it apart and reassembled it. Once again, I have to grind some bits and figure out a

good holding system. The only other power equipment is a small drill press and a 4 by 6

bandsaw.

Two questions. To get a completely vertical hole say in a cylinder block would one

do it on the drill press with that variable angle table removed, or mount it in a four jaw

chuck? Second, is there any way a fellow without reamers can do a tolerable job

at tolerances? I recognize that any play is critical but rushing off to the city to buy

a fistful of reamers is not exactly possible at the moment.

My thanks, Quincy

December 9, 2009
9:11 PM
Avatar
Rob
Upstate New York
Admin
Members
Forum Posts: 146
Member Since:
January 4, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I think the engine can be built by an inexperienced machinist if they have patience and are capable of doing basic procedures, like turning a piece to the right size, parting off, facing, drilling, tapping, etc.  How much time have you logged on your lathe since you restored it?  Also, do you have a mill or at least a milling attachment for your lathe?

I'd start with the simplest parts that you can make on your lathe and follow Bog's instructions.  I wouldn't worry about the crankshaft or manifold modification right now. 

Just concentrate on making one part at a time and don't be afraid to ask questions.  (Specific questions if possible.) You'll find that others will help if they can.

Rob

December 9, 2009
6:05 PM
Avatar
ageofaquarius21
Nova Scotia, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 3
Member Since:
December 7, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

HI, I noticed on one You Tube video of this machine that the inlet maniforld had been modified

under the direction of Bogstandard and I was interested in that modification. Also, any crank shaft

manufacturing advice would be appreciated.

My experience a long time ago was during two years of study when I became a mechanical

engineering technologist. During this time I learned the basics of the lathe- and not much more.

Now, with a 1943 Clausing Model 100 that I just restored I want to launch in. I have dug

up my old textbooks, looked at countless webpages, but still a small motor, especially accurate

layout and shortcuts would be appreciated. I realize this reveals how little experience I have

so any design concerns with this engine, suggested modifications, layout procedures, ideal

types of steel, etc. all would be helpful. My thanks in advance, Quincy

December 9, 2009
1:44 PM
Avatar
Rob
Upstate New York
Admin
Members
Forum Posts: 146
Member Since:
January 4, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

I 'd like to help you but I need a little more information.  What kind of tips are you looking for and how much experience do you have? 

December 9, 2009
12:16 PM
Avatar
ageofaquarius21
Nova Scotia, Canada
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 3
Member Since:
December 7, 2009
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Greetings; I have been pondering my first engine. I am drawn to the internet engine mentioned

above. Can anyone provide a few building tips for a first build, in particular for this engine?

thanks, Quincy

Forum Timezone: America/New_York

Most Users Ever Online: 52

Currently Online:
2 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

David Sobel: 20

Mikey: 13

ChrisXenon: 10

adamconant: 6

Bernd: 4

jposey: 3

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 1

Members: 1215

Moderators: 0

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 3

Forums: 7

Topics: 152

Posts: 321

Newest Members:

russell1, NikaJamesCacle

Administrators: Rob: 146, rleete: 47